Category Archives: Faculty Publications

Professor Stephan Weiler’s new REDI blog

Professor Stephan Weiler is on sabbatical this semester and has been visiting the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom as a Fulbright Distinguished Research Chair. Weiler is working on furthering the partnership between REDI@CSU and City-REDI. He has been asked to write a series of blog posts introducing himself, explaining how this partnership was developed, and what his Fulbright Scholarship will entail for City-REDI, the West Midlands, and other evolving regions across around the globe.

You can find the first blog of the series here: https://blog.bham.ac.uk/cityredi/meet-professor-stephan-weiler-fulbright-distinguished-research-chair-at-the-university-of-birmingham/

Professor Dave Mushinski and Professor Sammy Zahran

New study published by Professors Zahran, Mushinski, and Li

A new study by Professors Sammy Zahran, Dave Mushinski, and Cher Li has found that the quantity of delivery complications in hospitals are substantially higher during nights, weekends and holidays, and in teaching hospitals. The study, “Clinical capital and the risk of maternal labor and delivery complications: Hospital scheduling, timing and cohort turnover effects,” was published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal. They analyzed more than 2 million cases from 2005 to 2010, using detailed data obtained from the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The results of the study suggest that:

  • The odds of a mother experiencing a delivery complication are 21.3 percent higher during the night shift, and the odds of a delivery complication increase 1.8 percent with every hour worked within a shift.
  • A mother delivering an infant on a weekend is 8.6 percent more likely to encounter a complication than a mother delivering on a weekday.
  • Births occurring on holidays are particularly susceptible to labor or delivery complications, with holiday births being 29 percent more likely to have a complication.

 

Read the SOURCE story here.

This story was picked up by the New York Times March 4th: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/04/well/family/hospital-pregnancy-childbirth-delivery-complications.html

Corporations need to step up to preserve the world’s biodiversity

Economics Department Professors Edward Barbier and Joanne Burgess co-authored an article with Professor Thomas Dean of the College of Business titled “How to pay for saving biodiversity” which was published in the prestigious journal Science on May 4, 2018.

They argue that to preserve the rich array of species around the world, corporations will need to engage and contribute financially as part of a global agreement. In the piece, they propose modeling the new global pact after the 2015 Paris Climate Change Agreement. But instead of focusing primarily on governmental entities as partners, they say corporations in industries that rely on biodiversity should invest in the effort as well.

The reason for that, they claim, is that governments don’t have the financial wherewithal to contribute the $100 billion a year that would be needed to protect the earth’s broad range of animal and plant species. Secondly, and perhaps more importantly, corporations in industries like seafood, insurance and forest products stand to significantly increase their profits by investing in the effort — and avoid financial losses that would necessarily come with irreversible declines in biodiversity.

“Let’s get the companies and non-state entities involved from the beginning, so that we can deal with the funding issue,” says Barbier, a world-renowned environmental economist who joined CSU last year. “It’s the good thing for their bottom line, and corporations are beginning to realize that. I think we’re at a turning point, but if we don’t act quickly, we’re going to lose much of the world’s remaining biodiversity.”

The authors say the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity, one of the first international environmental agreements negotiated, has not done enough to reverse the decline of biological populations and diversity on land and in oceans. They add that neither has the Global Environmental Facility, which was created the same year for biodiversity conservation in developing countries. Those countries host the most biodiversity in part because so many of them have tropical climates.

Similarly, the CSU faculty write that the Aichi Biodiversity Targets that governments around the world have agreed to are seen as too modest because they call for conservation of only a small percentage of the habitats needed to save global biodiversity. Based on scientific recommendations, their proposed international agreement would preserve at least half of the world’s terrestrial, inland water, coastal and marine habitats by 2050.

“It is critical that the upcoming Convention on Biological Diversity in Egypt this November finds creative solutions to the current biodiversity conservation crisis,” Burgess says. “As our article discusses, establishing a Global Agreement for Biodiversity with expanded conservation and finance targets is required. Creating mechanisms for corporations to be part of the solution rather than part of the problem could help mobilize financial resources and create incentives to avert a catastrophic loss of biodiversity.”

Barbier and Dean met last year and began discussing the idea while serving together on a panel hosted by CSU’s Global Biodiversity Center, which is housed at the School of Global Environmental Sustainability. Barbier and Burgess, who are married, have been writing about corporate incentives for environmental stewardship for years.

According to projections in their article, the seafood industry stands to gain $53 billion annually from a $5 billion to $10 billion investment each year in a global agreement on biodiversity, while the insurance industry could see an additional $52 billion with a similar investment. By spending $15 to $30 billion annually, the forest products industry would attain its sustainable forest management goal. Companies that participate would also create new marketing opportunities such as certified labeling campaigns.

“This is where the right thing to do and the bottom line come together,” Barbier says. “And it’s fairly urgent. I don’t see the funding gap closing any other way.”

He notes that some industries have already seen corporations band together in sustainability agreements like the Seafood Business for Ocean Stewardship initiative.

“At its foundation, this article is arguing that corporations have a vested interest in the preservation of biodiversity, and that interest should lead them to support efforts to preserve our biosphere,” Dean said. “For too long we have viewed corporate and environmental interests as adversarial, when they need to become aligned if we are to be successful both economically and environmentally. What seems obvious to me is that corporations that depend on the health of our ecosystems are at risk of losing the foundations of their businesses in the long run. Growing awareness of this challenge will increasingly motivate corporations to engage.”

Their article continues to attract media attention internationally as can be seen in the June 28, 2018 publication “Scientists call for a Paris-style agreement to save life on Earth” on The Guardian’s website.

 

 

The Divide Between Rural and Urban America, in 6 Charts

By Brian Thiede, Lillie Greiman, Stephan Weiler, Steven C. Beda and Tessa Conroy

Editor’s note: We’ve all heard of the great divide between life in rural and urban America. But what are the factors that contribute to these differences? We asked sociologists, economists, geographers and historians to describe the divide from different angles. The data paint a richer and sometimes surprising picture of the U.S. today. The Conversation

“Why inequality is the most important economic challenge facing the next president” by Steven Pressman

Why inequality is the most important economic challenge facing the next president

By Steven Pressman

Finding a way to reduce inequality is key not only to solving a host of other problems but also to rescuing America’s fast-disappearing middle class.

 

Radio interview on the Matt Townsend Show can be heard online at: https://www.byuradio.org/episode/0fab7b1b-99cc-4907-beb4-f54b342db2d2/the-matt-townsend-show-income-inequality-psychology-of-scary-films-parent-previews?playhead=968&autoplay=true

Ben W. Garcia Economics Scholarship

We are pleased to announce our newest Economics scholarship.  ?????????????????????????

Ben Garcia received a B.S. in Economics from Colorado State University in 1981. He continued studying economics at the University of Notre Dame, receiving an M.A. in Economics with an emphasis on Labor Studies in 1983. He began working for Colorado
Labor Market Information, a Colorado state government agency that produces the official employment statistics for Colorado, such as the unemployment and job growth numbers.  He spent the early part of his career analyzing the Colorado economy, and explaining the analysis to other government agencies, non-profit organizations, the business community, and the news media. In the mid-1990’s Ben developed an interest in the World Wide Web as a vehicle for disseminating the economic information that he helped to produce. He initiated development of one of the first web sites available from the state government in Colorado. While his career changed to one with an information technology focus, he continued his economics career by teaching economics classes for the Colorado Community Colleges and Metropolitan State College.Garcia Economics Scholarship

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Colorado Economy on the Rebound – Mostly

Martin Shields, Economics Department“Colorado has more jobs than ever before, but recovery from the Great Recession continues to elude some areas of the state.”

Those are some of the findings included in a report from Colorado State University’s Regional Economics Institute (REI).

Dr. Martin Shields, CSU Economics Professor, said work needs to be done to help Colorado’s economy fully recover from the Great Recession. “Even though Colorado has more jobs than ever, many of the newly created positions pay less than average wages,” he said.  “As a result household incomes have stagnated. One of the real challenges the state faces is creating jobs that pay higher wages.”

REIThe complete article can be viewed below.

http://www.news.colostate.edu/Release/7199

REI releases updated information and analyses of Colorado’s economy through the REI blog at http://csurei.wordpress.com

Economics Dept. co-sponsors AAUP Workshops on Faculty Rights

The American Association of University Professors invites all tenured, tenure-track and non-tenure track faculty to

WORKSHOPS ON FACULTY RIGHTS

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Lory Student Center Room 230

9:00 – 11:00 am

“What Faculty Need to Know About University Finances”

11-00 – 12:00

“Building Faculty Power:  AAUP Organizing Workshop”

1:00 – 3:00 pm

“The Threat to Faculty at CSU-Pueblo”

Friday, March 14, 2014

Education Building Room 1

9:00 – 11:00 am

“Faculty Recruitment in Practice”

 

The full information flyer is found here

AAUP flyer

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American Association of University Professors
1133 Nineteenth Street, NW, Suite 200
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-737-5900

aaup@aaup.org