Seventh Annual AEA Conference on Teaching and Research in Economic Education

Undergraduate Women in Economics

Econ Alumni Scholarship winners Tyler Olson, Dr. Bernasek, & Lauren Burr

Graduate Students diversity in Econ

Dr. Paul Krugman, Dr. Bob Keller and Dr. Cher Li

Getting REDI

Dr. Tavani explaining economics

Alumnus John Morris

Foreign Trade University graduation

More than an academic department: a learning community.

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Welcome

The goal of the Department of Economics is to build a learning community that supports the intellectual development and professional aspirations of both students and faculty. Our undergraduate and graduate programs offer courses that cover an unusually wide range of economic thought, including neo-classical economics, Keynesian economics, institutional economics, Marxian economics and feminist economics.
We want our students to become critical thinkers who understand the debates about economic methodology and policy as well as the techniques of economic analysis.

Our faculty members have active research agendas and substantial scholarly records; nonetheless, our students are our first priority. We constantly strive to improve our teaching programs, and our faculty have won many teaching and advising awards. Our PhD program provides many opportunities for students to interact with faculty and to work with them on research projects. We have had an excellent track record in job placements for our graduate students. The department chair is always glad to meet prospective and current students, and to answer their questions – stop by any time!

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January 22

The first Brown Bag of the Spring semester is today! The Brown Bag Seminar Series offers current ECON and DARE graduate students the opportunity to present ongoing research or to workshop new ideas. The seminars are held on Mondays, and some Thursdays, from 12:00-1:00pm in Clark C307 and are open to everyone. Today ECON graduate student Alex Duvall-Pelham kicks off the series and will be presenting his paper: "Terms-of-Trade: Price Competitiveness Maters" Abstract: Tests of the balance of payments constrained growth model typically focus on income elasticities of demand in the traded sector. The role of price-competitiveness is treated as negligible and often neglected. This paper presents alternative specifications for the terms-of-trade in conventional Kaldorian import and export demand equations. I show that by taking into consideration the export prices of foreign competitors and prices of domestic substitutes for imports, relative prices become far more relevant in determining import and export demand and the corresponding equilibrium growth rates in a Keynesian framework. The results suggest policy strategies for developing economies given the absence of domestic substitutes for import goods and the dependence on exports as a source of foreign currency.