Category Archives: Alumni

UWE hosts Women in Economics Alumni Panel

The recently reenergized Undergraduate Women in Economics (UWE) club hosted a virtual alumni panel last Thursday, April 1 to encourage more women to consider studying economics.

Moderated by UWE student president Mya Wilson, who is a senior studying economics with a minor in business, the panel featured three recent graduates from CSU’s Economics department.

  • Adiam Tesfasselassie graduated from CSU with a bachelor’s degree in economics and sociology. She now lives in Washington, D.C. where she works as a Policy Analyst at the Georgetown Center on Poverty and Inequality. Her current research projects focus on the caregiving economy and market power, and she will enroll at Georgetown University for a Master’s in Data Science and Analytics this fall.
  • Kristen Malloy graduated from CSU with a double major in Economics and Business Administration (with a focus on finance). After graduation, she started her career as a Bank Examiner for the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City in the Denver branch. She was recently commissioned after an extensive 3.5-year training program at the Fed.
  • Sarah Small is a Ph.D. candidate and teaching instructor in the CSU’s Economics department, as well as a visiting researcher at Duke University’s Center for the History of Political Economy. She broadly specializes in feminist economics and is currently researching intrahousehold allocations of unpaid labor and entrepreneurship.

 

Mya Wilson and Professor Alex Bernasek were also recently interviewed on CTV 11’s segment “Humans of CSU” to talk about the need for UWE at CSU, where men outnumber women in the undergraduate economics program by a ratio of 5:1. This is an even greater gender gap than the national average, which is 3:1.

The virtual alumni event was recorded and is available to view on our website. For more information about UWE, please email uwecoloradostate@gmail.com and/or follow the group on Instagram at @uwecoloradostate.

Guy Numa

Professor Guy Numa on racism and exclusion 

Colorado State University and the College of Liberal Arts is committed to tackling the wicked problem of racism and exclusion. In this SOURCE story our own Dr. Guy Numa is one of three CLA professors highlighted. Numa stresses the importance of moving from discussion to action. He is a proponent for the creation of “baby bonds,” trust accounts that would be given to all newborns at birth, with larger amounts given to those in low-income families, to elevate the economic status of minority families.

Economics Department Office is Open (Virtually)!

The Economics Department office will be operating remotely until further notice. Normal office hours will be in effect Mondays thru Fridays: 7:30 am-12:00 pm and 1:00-4:30 pm (MST).

The office staff may be reached at 970-491-6324 or via email: CLA_Economics@colostate.edu

If you need assistance from any other faculty or staff, you are welcome to contact them directly via email. You can view our department’s website for contact information: https://economics.colostate.edu/people/

We are here to help! Stay well! #RamsTakeCareOfRams 🐏

Stephan Weiler

Winter 2019/Spring 2020 CLA Magazine featuring Professor Stephan Weiler now available

The Winter 2019/Spring 2020 edition of the CLA Magazine is now available for your viewing pleasure! The Liberal Arts Magazine showcases stories from faculty, students, and alumni on universal topics. In this issue, we apply the lenses of the liberal arts to place and space. Our department’s article highlights the work of Professor Stephan Weiler and REDI.

Identifying rural solutions to urban needs, and vice versa, has been a big part of Professor Weiler’s work for decades. With the Regional Economic Development Institute, Weiler and others are examining the many ways to bridge the urban-rural divide. Whether it’s malting barley, charter school supply and demand, or poverty and incarceration, rural and urban communities can learn from and benefit one another and provide opportunities for more people to succeed.

Changing of the guard. Today Dr. Shulman turned the page on his ten years as department chair. He has served us well.

Economics at Colorado State University

Today Dr. Shulman turned the page on his ten years as department chair. He has served us well.

“Some or even most of you have heard by now that I will finish as department chair when I complete my second term on June 30. Alex Bernasek will replace me. I am grateful to Alex and confident that she will prove to be a good leader for the department. Anita will replace her as Coordinator of Graduate Studies. On top of all that, Jenifer will retire in September. Next semester a new team will take the helm, marking a pivotal change for the department.

Our graduate program has prospered over the past ten years. The faculty has worked consistently to improve its academic content & structure. We have put more resources into the program, creating graduate student scholarships, offering online & classroom teaching opportunities & supporting conference travel. Funded research opportunities have significantly grown. We have not only survived, we have thrived as one of the few genuinely heterodox departments in the country. We offer our students a unique mix of intellectual perspectives & applied skills. Our job placement record is impressive & many of our students have gone on to successful careers. I am proud of what all of us have accomplished together.

As for my plans, I look forward to contributing to our teaching programs in some new ways, including playing a more active role in the principles system. I also hope to focus more on my role as the research director of the Center for the Study of Academic Labor. Come see me if you are interested in academic labor markets & the economics of higher education. Whatever your research interests, I would be glad to serve on dissertation committees, & to help you in whatever ways that I can.”

Best wishes,
Steven

 

 

COIN: Finding tech workers still an issue

COIN: Finding tech workers still an issue, as is rising housing costs

Certification schools, outreach to women, millennials boost qualified tech workforce

When the Colorado Innovation Network published its first talent report in 2012, it noted a startling decline in students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. That’s still a concern, but COIN took a different approach with its new report Tuesday. Within the top-jobs category of careers with higher wages and growth, 55 percent are STEM-related. “What has changed from four years ago is how we look at that talent and recognize how it moves forward,” said Anna Ewing, executive director of COIN, a privately funded organization launched by Gov. John Hickenlooper in 2011. “The influx of millennials is a very impactful trend on the talent landscape. People want to come here and work from a lifestyle perspective. But that puts more pressure on housing and transportation.” COIN, which opened its two-day summit Tuesday, is less a fixer of problems than an identifier of issues. The report cites many things for the community to consider, she said. “It’s going to necessitate that employers get more creative in how they keep employees engaged,” Ewing said. “With generational differences in the workforce and cultural changes, workers want flexibility. They want technology tools and to customize their own career path.” The disconnect between traditional college degrees and employers has spurred “badging certification” programs, such as Denver’s Galvanize, which trains students to become software developers with an entrepreneurial edge that tech companies are seeking.

COIN researchers interviewed Chris Onan, co-founder of Galvanize, which has graduated 200 students. Of its data-science grads, 93 percent found a job within six months and averaged a $115,000 starting salary. Full-stack grads started at $73,000, and 98 percent found jobs within six months. The company has made efforts to reach women, veterans and minorities. It expects 500 students to go through its program this year, but that’s not enough to meet demand, said Mark Saldaña, Galvanize’s marketing manager. “Galvanize is going to have to scale (up) to meet employer demand for talent and student demand for technical skills in the coming years,” he said. “We’re partnering with organizations like IBM and (President Barack) Obama’s TechHire initiative to fill the skills gap.”

Stephan Weiler, a Colorado State University economics professor, worked on earlier COIN reports but not this year’s. He said women will be taking on more roles because more women are going to college.

BUSINESS   By Tamara Chuang, The Denver Post, Posted: 08/25/2015

See complete article here:  COIN article

A Career in Economics

A career in Economics…it’s much more than you think.

Best College Majors, Kiplinger, September 16, 2015.

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/best-college-majors-career-2015-180137101.html#

 

 

Courtesy of American Economic Association.

Welcome Prof. Anders Fremstad

The Economics Department welcomes our newest faculty member – Dr. Anders Fremstad.

Anders

Anders is a new assistant professor of economics at CSU.  His interest in economics was first sparked by debates on issues like living wages and free trade.  After earning his B.S. in International Political Economy at Georgetown University, he spent a year volunteering at UPAVIM, a women’s cooperative in Guatemala City.  Prof. Fremstad received his Ph.D. in Economics at the University of Massachusetts – Amherst.   He is broadly interested in economic inequality and environmental sustainability.  His current research focuses on the economic and environmental impacts of online platforms associated with the sharing economy.  This fall Prof. Fremstad will be teaching Recent Economic Thought (Econ 474).